[vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1462850584089{margin-top: 15px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Cervical Cancer Vaccine & Genital Warts Vaccine” font_container=”tag:h1|font_size:35|text_align:center|color:%23040060″ google_fonts=”font_family:Libre%20Baskerville%3Aregular%2Citalic%2C700|font_style:700%20bold%20regular%3A700%3Anormal” css=”.vc_custom_1582511330251{margin-bottom: 10px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1423751086688{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_empty_space height=”15px”][vc_custom_heading text=”What are Cervical cancer and Genital warts, and how are they transmitted?” font_container=”tag:h2|font_size:20|text_align:left|color:%23040060″ google_fonts=”font_family:Libre%20Baskerville%3Aregular%2Citalic%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”][vc_column_text]Both cervical cancer and genital warts are caused by Human Papillomaviruses (HPV). HPV can be managed using a Cervical Cancer Vaccine.

Cervical cancer is a cancer of the neck of the womb, which is called the cervix.

Genital warts are skin growths that can occur at the genital areas, and cause great discomfort.

HPV can cause,[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1423751086688{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]In women:

  • Cervical cancer
  • Vulvar cancer
  • Vaginal cancer
  • Abnormal/precancerous cervical lesions

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]In both men and women:

  • Genital warts
  • Anal cancer
  • Abnormal/precancerous anal lesions
  • Persistent infection

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1423751086688{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_empty_space height=”15px”][vc_column_text]HPV is primarily transmitted through any kind of sexual activity that involves direct skin-to-skin contact.

Many HPV infected persons are asymptomatic (no signs and symptoms) which means that HPV can be transmitted to others without knowing it. It is estimated that 8 out of 10 people will get HPV at some point in their lifetime, although most people clear it through their immune system. If the HPV virus remains in your body for too long, it starts to cause changes in the cells of the cervix (or affected area) that can lead to cancer

There are more than 100 HPV types. HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58 causes cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer. Particularly, HPV types 16 and 18 account for approximately 70% of cervical cancer and about 95% of anal cancer. HPV types 6 and 11 causes genital warts.

These HPV types are preventable.

There are 3 types of Cervical Cancer Vaccines and Genital Wart Vaccines available for the prevention of the following HPV types:

  • Cervarix®: HPV types 16 and 18
  • Gardasil-4®: HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18
  • Gardasil-9®: HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58

The HPV vaccinations (Cervical Cancer Vaccine & Genital Wart Vaccine) are a part of the National Adult Immunisation Schedule by the Ministry of Health, Singapore. For adults aged 18 years or older.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”18936″ img_size=”1067×800″][vc_empty_space height=”15px”][vc_custom_heading text=”Did you know that men can take Gardasil® as well? ” font_container=”tag:h2|font_size:20|text_align:left|color:%23040060″ google_fonts=”font_family:Libre%20Baskerville%3Aregular%2Citalic%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”][vc_column_text]Although men may not require a cervical cancer vaccine, the Gardasil® vaccine also protects against genital warts that can affect men as well. The protection against HPV also aids in reducing the chances of your partner getting infected by HPV. The best time to receive HPV vaccines are before any sexual contact is initiated. Men and women who have had sexual contact may still be vaccinated on a case-by-case basis.[/vc_column_text][vc_custom_heading text=”Who needs Cervical Cancer Vaccine and Genital Warts Vaccine? ” font_container=”tag:h2|font_size:20|text_align:left|color:%23040060″ google_fonts=”font_family:Libre%20Baskerville%3Aregular%2Citalic%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”][vc_column_text]

  1. Individuals age between 9 – 26 years old who have not received a cervical cancer vaccine and/or a genital warts vaccine
    (Most effective before first sexual exposure who have not been exposed yet to HPV types)
  2. Adults above 26 years old
  3. Sexually active persons with multiple partners
  4. Men with sexual contact with other men

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text font_size=”12″]*Please note:
Cervical cancer vaccines are not a substitute for routine cervical cancer screening. Regular screening is still your best protection against cervical cancer. You should still undergo screening for cervical cancer after receiving your cervical cancer vaccine. The new MOH guidelines suggest a PAP smear every 3 years for those between 25 and 29 years old, and HPV testing every 5 years for those above 30 years old, regular PAP smears are still your best protection against cervical cancer.[/vc_column_text][vc_custom_heading text=”How many doses are required and time schedule for the Cervical Cancer Vaccine and Genital Warts Vaccine? ” font_container=”tag:h2|font_size:20|text_align:left|color:%23040060″ google_fonts=”font_family:Libre%20Baskerville%3Aregular%2Citalic%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”][vc_column_text]

  1. Individuals who experience severe allergic reactions from a previous vaccination; or
  2. Allergies to specific vaccine components

[/vc_column_text][vc_custom_heading text=”How many doses are required and time schedule for the Cervical Cancer Vaccine and Genital Warts Vaccine? ” font_container=”tag:h2|font_size:20|text_align:left|color:%23040060″ google_fonts=”font_family:Libre%20Baskerville%3Aregular%2Citalic%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”][vc_column_text]

Vaccination/Age 9 – 14 years old 15 – 26 years old
Cervarix® 2 doses

Time schedule : 0, 6 months

(0 month refers to the day of vaccination)

 

3 doses

Time schedule : 0, 1, 6 months

(0 month refers to the day of vaccination)

 

Gardasil-4® 2 doses

Time schedule : 0, 6 months

(0 month refers to the day of vaccination)

3 doses

Time schedule : 0, 2, 6 months

(0 month refers to the day of vaccination)

 

Gardasil-9® 2 doses

Time schedule : 0, 6 months

(0 month refers to the day of vaccination)

 

3 doses

Time schedule : 0, 2, 6 months

(0 month refers to the day of vaccination)

 

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1423751086688{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Who should not receive the vaccination?” font_container=”tag:h2|font_size:20|text_align:left|color:%23040060″ google_fonts=”font_family:Libre%20Baskerville%3Aregular%2Citalic%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”][vc_column_text]

  1. Individuals who experience severe allergic reactions from previous vaccination; or
  2. Allergies to specific vaccine components
  3. Pregnant women

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Cervarix ® – For female
3 doses – $481.50* (inclusive of GST)
*Medisave claimable for females age between 18 – 26 years old 

 

Gardasil-9 ® – For female and male
3 doses – $802.50 (inclusive of GST)

[/vc_column_text]Book Your Appointment Now[vc_empty_space height=”30px”][vc_column_text font_size=”12″]More info from:
Ministry of Health Singapore: https://www.healthhub.sg/a-z/diseases-and-conditions/701/faqs-on-hpv-and-hpv-immunisation
Mayo Clinic USA: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hpv-infection/symptoms-causes/syc-20351596[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]